Posts in American Voices
Five Years of the CP Blog: “A Way for the Global Church to Speak to the West”

There is true revival going on in China. I hope our blog brings and shares that with a Western society that, in my opinion, is losing that vitality and is dying spiritually. I’m hopeful God would deign to use the teachings of these Chinese pastors to help revive the American church, and to bring spiritual life and vitality to those who hear from Chinese Christians.

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A Prayer Over Hong Kong

Ultimately, the church in Hong Kong can show the very real hope they have in Christ by living as people who are truly free. It is right and just for churches to speak out against unjust laws and defend freedom, but they will never have to do it from a place of desperation. They can perhaps learn from their brothers and sisters in the mainland, and from Pastor Wang Yi, who is now in prison for his faithfulness to the gospel. Even though individual rights can be violated and religious freedom can be limited, the church of Christ cannot be bound.

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Xi Jinping’s Plan for Church Growth in the World

Large scale persecution and repression has become the new norm in China and it cannot be denied. While the church may not be defined solely by this narrative of suffering, it is clearly the case that it is alive, well, and quite real. It is still a factor in how the house church identifies and defines herself. It is not my goal is this small piece to argue this case in particular but rather to acknowledge it in the face of those attempts to downplay this important element.

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The Growth of the Urban “Teenage” House Church

While all metaphors have limiting factors, especially if they are overused, the teenager metaphor applied to the house church in China seems to work quite well. The metaphor is extremely useful because it helps us better understand not only how the church identifies itself, but it also helps us understand more comprehensively the interaction between the church and societal forces that shape it.

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New Year Reflections: More Than Well-Wishes

Just last week, several families from Early Rain Covenant Church in Chengdu had their bank accounts frozen by the government because they are members of the church. Years of savings are gone, and some of their husbands are still locked up in prison. Believers like them "are scum of the world, the refuse of all things" (1 Corinthians 4:13). They look very different from the images of wealth, health, and happiness that we wish upon each other on Chinese New Year. And yet I doubt that any well wishes – or even actual wealth, health, and happiness – can be of any comfort or enticement to them, and I hope the same for us.

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What’s in a Name?

Several months after moving to China, I doodled that new name in my journal. I was praying that day, reading scripture, spending a quiet hour with God. As I sketched my new name, I realized these characters were not actually given to me by my Chinese friend: this new name, the one that meant “beautiful” and “restful,” came from my Heavenly Father. 

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Enter Into the World of Chinese New Year

One New Years Eve, while the villagers were preparing to once again escape from the village, an old beggar came into the village to ask for food. An elderly woman quickly gave him a bowl of rice and warned him that the monster was on its way, and he too should leave the village soon. The old beggar said, "If you let me stay in your house for one night, I have a plan to scare the monster away." The woman was skeptical, but she was in a hurry to leave, so she gave him the permission to stay.

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