Posts in Jeff Kyle
How I Have Been Shaped By China

Though the American church is often characterized by a thirst for knowledge and for being correct with theology, we often talk about God the Father and God the Son, but forget to talk about the Holy Spirit. Chinese pray to the Holy Spirit and actively rely on him for their spiritual and daily nourishment. My boss is so quick to pray in almost any moment or conversation. I love how Chinese value prayer, and I want to be a more prayerful person because of their example.

Read More
Missions – The Current Situation in America

Since we are already fifteen years into the 21st century, we need to look critically at our world and ask how we ought to respond as the church. Internally, we need to realize how missions terminology has affected us. We have tended to make a distinction between those who go and those who send. It has created a divide so that those who send do not view themselves as active participants, which is very unfortunate.

Read More
Why You Should Come to "The Church in a Global-Local World"

Whether you are new to the China Partnership or have been partners for a while, we invite you to attend our annual conference. The title for our conference this year is “The Church in a Global-Local World,” and we have structured it differently than past years. This year, our totally new conference structure will include: 1) A one-day conference, rather than two days 2) A conference setting as opposed to a “meeting” 3) Talks, panels, and discussion times rather than ministry reports 4) Speakers addressing both global and local topics in missions

Read More
Meditating on the Incarnation: An Invitation to Step out of the Steeple’s Shadows

Christmas is about celebrating the life-altering birth and appearance of Jesus the Son of God. The church often emphasizes the death and resurrection of Christ, which are of utmost importance, but his birth and incarnation are vital to our daily life. When we take the time to meditate on Jesus’ birth, we begin to realize just how fascinating and significant it is to us today. Jesus Christ, the Son of the Most High God, who for all eternity experienced perfect and unadulterated fellowship among the members of the Trinity, willingly chose to give up that fellowship and enter this fallen and broken world. Jesus was there at the creation of the world and we know that all things were created by him, for him, through him, and in him. Jesus’ choice to enter this shattered world and to live and walk alongside it is incredibly bold, and humbling to understand. This is precisely why we need to sit and be still, meditating on the significance of the incarnation and the choice of Jesus to come.

Read More
Why We Partner with The Gospel Coalition (TGC)

The China Partnership has been privileged to see the development of a movement of gospel-centered churches in China over the past several years and this Chinese movement shows many similarities to The Gospel Coalition (TGC). As this movement has grown in China we have had the opportunity to learn from a group like TGC. TGC is a wonderful coalition of evangelical churches in the United States that are thoroughly committed to faithfulness to the gospel by adopting foundational documents that include a confessional statement and theological vision of ministry. Like the China Partnership, TGC is focused on ensuring that the gospel message of the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ is applied to the Christian not only at his or her salvation but also throughout the believer’s Christian journey. TGC brings together churches from multiple different backgrounds to agree on the gospel.

Read More
Our Vision for America: Churches as Representative of the Final Chapter

Before Jesus ascended to heaven, he proclaimed the Great Commission. This was not a command to the super talented and gifted, but rather to the Church, his bride, and he intended for all to see themselves as being a part of it. God has always been on mission and he continues his work through the Church. Churches generally try to engage their congregations with missions and traditionally this takes the form of asking all to participate either by going or sending. This has inadvertently created a gap between those sent out and those providing prayer and financial support. While the work it takes to send is encouraged and praised, it often seems like the “real” work happens overseas, creating a dichotomy between those who go and the rest of the church.

Read More