Posts in Wang Yi
In Search of Holistic Ethics: A Chinese Pastor Considers Sexual Identity and the Christian Faith, Part 3

In the Bible, the basic boundary of marriage is that "a man shall leave his father and his mother and hold fast to his wife, and they shall become one flesh." Leave, cleave, hold fast, and become one flesh - this is the Bible's position on marriage and sex. From a biblical standpoint, marriage is designed by God. Union in marriage (including the joy of sex) is blessed and permitted by God. The union between a man and a woman is an ideal arrangement for the created, not the result of human lust. The results of lust are undeniable suffering and bondage. The holiness and beauty of sex, from a Christian perspective, can only be attained within this relational boundary.

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In Search of Holistic Ethics: A Chinese Pastor Considers Sexual Identity and the Christian Faith, Part 2

Christians believe that the value of marriage and sex are grounded within the blessing and boundary of God's relationship with man. If homosexuality simply stopped at individual behaviors, Christians would not request the government to mandatorily rectify these ethical behaviors. Liberal political scientists hold the same position, and it conforms to the Bible's teaching. At the same time, when a Christian says homosexuality is a sin of lustfulness, he must admit that he is also sinful. Jesus said, "Everyone who looks at a woman with lustful intent has already committed adultery." This is not a Confucian prohibition on external behavior. The opposite of lustfulness is holiness. God's purpose is to call people to be holy. In other words, love and holiness are connected together. 

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In Search of Holistic Ethics: A Chinese Pastor Considers Sexual Identity and the Christian Faith, Part 1

As the Chinese house church grows, so does its desire and ability to engage with questions of ethics, morality, and identity not only on China’s social landscape, but on the global stage as well. This is the first post in a series by a Chinese house church pastor engaging the issues concerning homosexuality and the Christian faith not only in his Chinese context, but also in the light of Western developments. This series was originally published on the pastor’s personal blog in 2007 and updated and republished this past summer.

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